Posts

  • Installing Linters Sublime Text 3

    Everything with a $ should be ran in the terminal without the ($ ).
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  • Linting Your Code: Installing the Linters

    Linting is basically the act of running your code through a tool that catches syntax issues, common pitfalls, and helps enforce a general coding style among other things. This does not actually test the code like a unit test or integration test. How ever it helps stop you from shooting yourself in the foot with simple typos.
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  • Base Environment Setup

    I have a few posts in mind that require a few of the same steps so I figured I would catalog them here. These should be things every developer regardless of wether you are more of a front end or backend developer. They are extremely easy to get setup now more than ever. There was once a point where I have to fight and wrangle some of these tools I’m looking at you PHP. The upside to having these few base things installed is adding tools like Bower front end package management, Grunt/Gulp/Broccoli for task running and Sass for making CSS more fun. So here we go lets install all the things!!!
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  • Has WP_Query Abstracted To Much?

    I was working on a project recently where I ran into a situation where WP_Query, well actually it was WP_User_Query, just would not work. So I feel back to raw SQL through wpdb and to my astonishment PHPCS with WordPress coding standards discourages the use of wpdb. I know it is not a total outright do not use but still. It got me to thinking maybe WP_Query abstracts too much away from the developer.
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  • Setting Up a Jekyll Blog - Part 5

    So now we have setup, tweaked, and styled our new Jekyll site. Now it is time for the whole world to see and admire our work, at least we hope they will. There is a large range of options in the Jekyll Documentation about Deployments but I am going to focus on Github Pages since it is extremely easy to get started. The one caveat is that Github rightfully so restricts you to a few plugins so if you need some more control you will need to move to a new hosting provider. Which moving a static site compared to a traditional CMS is relatively easier since everything is just a static file in a Git repository.
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  • Setting Up a Jekyll Blog - Part 4

    So now that we know how to get started with building the structure of our site we can start styling. Since Jekyll is based on Ruby it makes sense that the preprocessor of choice is Sass/SCSS. I personally use SCSS but you could technically us Less, Stylus, PostCSS or whatever suits your fancy.
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  • Using Trello to Manage Your Blog Posts

    So I have been trying to get in the habit of writing more but to do that it helps to have a bank of ideas. So I do not have to sit down and try to find something to write about. I’ve really liked using Trello to catalog my possible ideas for posts to write. This has really been helping me keep up with at least writing a few times a week since I have a large range of ideas to write about.
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  • Change URLs On Your WP Engine Install

    We recently switched to WP Engine which is an excellent choice for WordPress hosting. Managed hosting I believe is the best way to host a WordPress site. However it does have some quirks compared to our old host.
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  • Is Apple Pay, Coin, etc. Helpful?

    Are “card consolidators” like Apple Pay, Coin, etc. useful? I would say it depends on, it really depends on where you shop and if you are ok still bringing a backup card. I have been using both Apple Pay and Coin for the last few months interchangeably when I can. I know the field is still young and has a long way to go however the support really makes it tough to justify. As well as when I first ordered my coin almost 2 years ago I had probably more like 5-8 cards possible in my wallet now I have 2 payment cards on average.
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  • Setting Up a Jekyll Blog - Part 3

    Jekyll + LiquidJekyll uses a templating language named Liquid developed at Shopify. This gives you so extra abiliteis above that of plain old HTML. Such as conditionals, loops, access to variables, etc. which allows you to do things that traditionally required another language. You can find more information about Liquid on their wiki.
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